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Friday, 18 August 2017

Donald Trump's biracial ex, Kara Young, others spill some tea on if he is 'personally racist'

A report in the New York Times that explored whether President Trump harbors racial feeling, interviewed several of Trump's black friends for the story, all of whom said they never saw signs of racism.

Only Democratic activist and liberal MSNBC host Al Sharpton, who has associated with Trump in the past, said he sees signs of racism in the president.

The story was published Thursday in light of Trump's comments about the violence in Charlottesville, Vargina.

Trump drew criticisms this week after he maintained that "both sides" of protesters at the white supremacy rally in Charlottesville bear responsibility for violence that broke out and resulted in the death of one woman.

The question being asked: Is Donal Trump personally racist?"

Among those interviewed was an American fashion model and actress, Kara Young, a biracial former girlfriend of Trump, who said, "That was not my experience" in their relationship. She also said that she "never heard him say a disparaging comment towards any race of people."

“I didn’t hide my race from Donald Trump. He knew,” Ms. Young said in a rare interview. “He would say, ‘You’re like Derek Jeter.’ And I would say, ‘Exactly.’”

“I never heard him say a disparaging comment towards any race of people,” she added.

Ms. Young, while adamant in her defense of Trump, did discount his elbow-rubbing with the black celebrity class as an indication of his open-mindedness.

 “It’s definitely easier to be with your own kind. It’s easier for everybody, so if someone is super, super special and super, super interesting you can take them out,” Ms. Young said. “I think it was very interesting to him to meet and hang out with Russell Simmons and meet Sean Combs.”

But when asked whether she thought Trump was racist or supported white supremacist ideals, Ms. Young said, “That was not my experience.”




Ms. Young was among the few African-Americans to be personally close to the real estate developer and reality television star.

 She dated Trump nearly 20 years ago, but Ms. Young, whose mother is black and whose father is white, recalled a man with limited understanding of other cultures. He didn’t talk much about race or racial history, she said, but he had a curious racial awareness and a propensity for stereotypes.

“We went to the U.S. Open once, and a lot of black people came because it was Venus and Serena,” she said, referring to the Williams sisters. “He was impressed that a lot of black people came to the U.S. Open because they were playing.”

Black people, he seemed to think, did not watch tennis.

Ms. Young, who would not give her age but said she was roughly two decades younger than Trump, began dating him around 1997. Trump spotted her at a party in the Hamptons and later asked someone for her number and called her.

Their pairing made headlines, after Ms. Young was reported to have left her then-boyfriend, a celebrity reporter named A.J. Benza, for Trump, a fact that Trump boasted of on talk radio.

“A.J. doesn’t like Trump for one reason: I stole his girlfriend. I took her away like he was a dog,”  Trump told his friend, the radio shock jock Howard Stern.

Ms. Young said she had watched the fallout from Charlottesville and was “horrified” by his comments putting white supremacists and counter-protesters on the same plane.

She despaired over the racial landscape in the country and her former boyfriend’s stoking of tensions.

“It’s horrifying what happened at the rally,” Ms. Young said. “I think it’s crazy, and I think it’s sad that this is where our country is.”

In the interview,  the African-Americans in Trump's inner circle responded with an emphatic no, when asked if Trump is personally racist?
Among President Trump’s closest African-American associates are, from left, Omarosa Manigault-Newman, a White House aide, Ben Carson, the secretary of housing and urban development, and Lynne Patton, head of the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s New York and New Jersey office.
Among President Trump’s closest African-American associates are, from left, Omarosa Manigault-Newman, a White House aide, Ben Carson, the secretary of housing and urban development, and Lynne Patton, head of the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s New York and New Jersey office.
Most privately describe him as a 71-year-old man with fixed views and a cloistered history, raised in a heavily white enclave in Queens, who came of age and built a tower in the Manhattan sky when New York City was roiling with racial strife.

“Just because you’re a nationalist and you’re white doesn’t make you a white nationalist,” said Katrina Pierson, an African-American who was a spokeswoman for Trump’s presidential campaign. “Putting Americans first makes you a nationalist and in that case, I’m a nationalist. I think we should take care of our families and our children first.”

Ben Carson, the secretary of housing and urban development and the only African-American in Trump’s cabinet, said while on a trip to Louisiana on Monday that the controversy over Trump’s statements on the violence in Charlottesville were “little squabbles” that were “being blown out of proportion.”

“We have got to begin to think more logically and stop trying to stir up controversy and start concentrating on the issues that really threaten us and threaten our children,” Carson said.


Lynne Patton, who heads the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s New York and New Jersey office and is black, said Trump had a diverse set of people around him that included some close African-American associates, like Carson and Omarosa Manigault-Newman, a White House aide.

The president “doesn’t see color the way the average person does,” she said. He assesses people based on “their successes and their failures.”
 

Pierson said she was proof that Trump was not a racist because as soon as he decided to run for president, he hired her as a national spokeswoman for his campaign and encouraged her to speak on multiple television networks.

“A racist does not pick a single black mother to represent his entire freaking presidential campaign,”  Pierson said. “A racist would not endorse Jesse Jackson’s presidential campaign in the ’80s twice. A racist would also not spend his time and his resources to bring African-Americans into Wall Street.”

Mr. Wallach recalled Mr. Trump telling a colleague at the company to apologize to Mr. Wallach for an anti-Semitic comment once.

“He judges people by what kind of deal he can make with them,” Mr. Wallach said. “That’s his god.”


Read the full article here





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